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Systems biology approach to study the high altitude adaptation in tibetans

De,Bi; Huajun,Xiao; Cuihong,Zhou; Jun,Zhou; Xiaoyan,Deng; Xiaopeng,Liu
Fonte: Instituto de Tecnologia do Paraná - Tecpar Publicador: Instituto de Tecnologia do Paraná - Tecpar
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica Formato: text/html
Publicado em 01/02/2013 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
1018.7075%
The aim of this work was to study an integrative systems biology research strategy to construct a network including the protein-protein interactions (PPIs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) and identify the functional biological processes and pathways for high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans. The pathway enrichment analysis revealed that the genes in the network were mainly involved in signling the pathways and the function of microRNAs was concentrated in the signling pathways, which suggested that miRNAs might contribute to the Tibetans high-altitude adaptation through the participation in signaling pathway. These results contribute to better understanding on the high-altitude adaptation of the Tibetans.

The Molecular Basis of High-Altitude Adaptation in Deer Mice

Storz, Jay F; Sabatino, Stephen J; Hoffmann, Federico G; Gering, Eben J; Moriyama, Hideaki; Ferrand, Nuno; Monteiro, Bruno; Nachman, Michael W
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
605.14094%
Elucidating genetic mechanisms of adaptation is a goal of central importance in evolutionary biology, yet few empirical studies have succeeded in documenting causal links between molecular variation and organismal fitness in natural populations. Here we report a population genetic analysis of a two-locus α-globin polymorphism that underlies physiological adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia in natural populations of deer mice, Peromyscus maniculatus. This system provides a rare opportunity to examine the molecular underpinnings of fitness-related variation in protein function that can be related to a well-defined selection pressure. We surveyed DNA sequence variation in the duplicated α-globin genes of P. maniculatus from high- and low-altitude localities (i) to identify the specific mutations that may be responsible for the divergent fine-tuning of hemoglobin function and (ii) to test whether the genes exhibit the expected signature of diversifying selection between populations that inhabit different elevational zones. Results demonstrate that functionally distinct protein alleles are maintained as a long-term balanced polymorphism and that adaptive modifications of hemoglobin function are produced by the independent or joint effects of five amino acid mutations that modulate oxygen-binding affinity.

Evolutionary and functional insights into the mechanism underlying high-altitude adaptation of deer mouse hemoglobin

Storz, Jay F.; Runck, Amy M.; Sabatino, Stephen J.; Kelly, John K.; Ferrand, Nuno; Moriyama, Hideaki; Weber, Roy E.; Fago, Angela
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
700.3941%
Adaptive modifications of heteromeric proteins may involve genetically based changes in single subunit polypeptides or parallel changes in multiple genes that encode distinct, interacting subunits. Here we investigate these possibilities by conducting a combined evolutionary and functional analysis of duplicated globin genes in natural populations of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) that are adapted to different elevational zones. A multilocus analysis of nucleotide polymorphism and linkage disequilibrium revealed that high-altitude adaptation of deer mouse hemoglobin involves parallel functional differentiation at multiple unlinked gene duplicates: two α-globin paralogs on chromosome 8 and two β-globin paralogs on chromosome 1. Differences in O2-binding affinity of the alternative β-chain hemoglobin isoforms were entirely attributable to allelic differences in sensitivity to 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (DPG), an allosteric cofactor that stabilizes the low-affinity, deoxygenated conformation of the hemoglobin tetramer. The two-locus β-globin haplotype that predominates at high altitude is associated with suppressed DPG-sensitivity (and hence, increased hemoglobin-O2 affinity), which enhances pulmonary O2 loading under hypoxia. The discovery that allelic differences in DPG-sensitivity contribute to adaptive variation in hemoglobin–O2 affinity illustrates the value of integrating evolutionary analyses of sequence variation with mechanistic appraisals of protein function. Investigation into the functional significance of the deer mouse β-globin polymorphism was motivated by the results of population genetic analyses which revealed evidence for a history of divergent selection between elevational zones. The experimental measures of O2-binding properties corroborated the tests of selection by demonstrating a functional difference between the products of alternative alleles.

Identifying positive selection candidate loci for high-altitude adaptation in Andean populations

Bigham, Abigail W; Mao, Xianyun; Mei, Rui; Brutsaert, Tom; Wilson, Megan J; Julian, Colleen Glyde; Parra, Esteban J; Akey, Joshua M; Moore, Lorna G; Shriver, Mark D
Fonte: BioMed Central Publicador: BioMed Central
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 01/12/2009 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
724.1246%
High-altitude environments (>2,500 m) provide scientists with a natural laboratory to study the physiological and genetic effects of low ambient oxygen tension on human populations. One approach to understanding how life at high altitude has affected human metabolism is to survey genome-wide datasets for signatures of natural selection. In this work, we report on a study to identify selection-nominated candidate genes involved in adaptation to hypoxia in one highland group, Andeans from the South American Altiplano. We analysed dense microarray genotype data using four test statistics that detect departures from neutrality. Using a candidate gene, single nucleotide polymorphism-based approach, we identified genes exhibiting preliminary evidence of recent genetic adaptation in this population. These included genes that are part of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF) pathway, a biochemical pathway involved in oxygen homeostasis, as well as three other genomic regions previously not known to be associated with high-altitude phenotypes. In addition to identifying selection-nominated candidate genes, we also tested whether the HIF pathway shows evidence of natural selection. Our results indicate that the genes of this biochemical pathway as a group show no evidence of having evolved in response to hypoxia in Andeans. Results from particular HIF-targeted genes...

Living the high life: high-altitude adaptation

Scheinfeldt, Laura B; Tishkoff, Sarah A
Fonte: BioMed Central Publicador: BioMed Central
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
698.7266%
Genome-wide scans demonstrate that genetic variants associated with high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans and Andeans arose independently as a result of convergent adaptation.

EGLN1 involvement in high-altitude adaptation revealed through genetic analysis of extreme constitution types defined in Ayurveda

Aggarwal, Shilpi; Negi, Sapna; Jha, Pankaj; Singh, Prashant K.; Stobdan, Tsering; Pasha, M. A. Qadar; Ghosh, Saurabh; Agrawal, Anurag; ; Prasher, Bhavana; Mukerji, Mitali; ; Brahmachari, S. K.; Majumder, P. P.; Mukerji, M.; Habib, S.; Dash, D.; Ray, K.; B
Fonte: National Academy of Sciences Publicador: National Academy of Sciences
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
718.2465%
It is being realized that identification of subgroups within normal controls corresponding to contrasting disease susceptibility is likely to lead to more effective predictive marker discovery. We have previously used the Ayurvedic concept of Prakriti, which relates to phenotypic differences in normal individuals, including response to external environment as well as susceptibility to diseases, to explore molecular differences between three contrasting Prakriti types: Vata, Pitta, and Kapha. EGLN1 was one among 251 differentially expressed genes between the Prakriti types. In the present study, we report a link between high-altitude adaptation and common variations rs479200 (C/T) and rs480902 (T/C) in the EGLN1 gene. Furthermore, the TT genotype of rs479200, which was more frequent in Kapha types and correlated with higher expression of EGLN1, was associated with patients suffering from high-altitude pulmonary edema, whereas it was present at a significantly lower frequency in Pitta and nearly absent in natives of high altitude. Analysis of Human Genome Diversity Panel-Centre d’Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (HGDP-CEPH) and Indian Genome Variation Consortium panels showed that disparate genetic lineages at high altitudes share the same ancestral allele (T) of rs480902 that is overrepresented in Pitta and positively correlated with altitude globally (P < 0.001)...

High altitude adaptation in Daghestani populations from the Caucasus

Pagani, Luca; Ayub, Qasim; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Xue, Yali; Baillie, J. Kenneth; Chen, Yuan; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Turner, Daniel J.; Tofanelli, Sergio; Bulayeva, Kazima; Kidd, Kenneth; Paoli, Giorgio; Tyler-Smith, Chris
Fonte: Springer-Verlag Publicador: Springer-Verlag
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
709.2814%
We have surveyed 15 high-altitude adaptation candidate genes for signals of positive selection in North Caucasian highlanders using targeted re-sequencing. A total of 49 unrelated Daghestani from three ethnic groups (Avars, Kubachians, and Laks) living in ancient villages located at around 2,000 m above sea level were chosen as the study population. Caucasian (Adygei living at sea level, N = 20) and CEU (CEPH Utah residents with ancestry from northern and western Europe; N = 20) were used as controls. Candidate genes were compared with 20 putatively neutral control regions resequenced in the same individuals. The regions of interest were amplified by long-PCR, pooled according to individual, indexed by adding an eight-nucleotide tag, and sequenced using the Illumina GAII platform. 1,066 SNPs were called using false discovery and false negative thresholds of ~6%. The neutral regions provided an empirical null distribution to compare with the candidate genes for signals of selection. Two genes stood out. In Laks, a non-synonymous variant within HIF1A already known to be associated with improvement in oxygen metabolism was rediscovered, and in Kubachians a cluster of 13 SNPs located in a conserved intronic region within EGLN1 showing high population differentiation was found. These variants illustrate both the common pathways of adaptation to high altitude in different populations and features specific to the Daghestani populations...

Genomic insights into adaptation to high-altitude environments

Cheviron, Z A; Brumfield, R T
Fonte: Nature Publishing Group Publicador: Nature Publishing Group
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
616.33527%
Elucidating the molecular genetic basis of adaptive traits is a central goal of evolutionary genetics. The cold, hypoxic conditions of high-altitude habitats impose severe metabolic demands on endothermic vertebrates, and understanding how high-altitude endotherms cope with the combined effects of hypoxia and cold can provide important insights into the process of adaptive evolution. The physiological responses to high-altitude stress have been the subject of over a century of research, and recent advances in genomic technologies have opened up exciting opportunities to explore the molecular genetic basis of adaptive physiological traits. Here, we review recent literature on the use of genomic approaches to study adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia in terrestrial vertebrates, and explore opportunities provided by newly developed technologies to address unanswered questions in high-altitude adaptation at a genomic scale.

Metabolic insight into mechanisms of high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans

Ge, Ri-Li; Simonson, Tatum S.; Cooksey, Robert C.; Tanna, Uran; Qin, Ga; Huff, Chad D.; Witherspoon, David J.; Xing, Jinchuan; Zhengzhong, Bai; Prchal, Josef T.; Jorde, Lynn B.; McClain, Donald A.
Fonte: PubMed Publicador: PubMed
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
722.66445%
Recent studies have identified genes involved in high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans. Genetic variants/haplotypes within regions containing three of these genes (EPAS1, EGLN1, and PPARA) are associated with relatively decreased hemoglobin levels observed in Tibetans at high altitude, providing corroborative evidence for genetic adaptation to this extreme environment. The mechanisms that afford adaptation to high-altitude hypoxia, however, remain unclear. Considering the strong metabolic demands imposed by hypoxia, we hypothesized that a shift in fuel preference to glucose oxidation and glycolysis at the expense of fatty acid oxidation would improve adaptation to decreased oxygen availability. Correlations between serum free fatty acids and lactate concentrations in Tibetan groups living at high altitude and putatively selected haplotypes provide insight into this hypothesis. An EPAS1 haplotype that exhibits a signal of positive selection is significantly associated with increased lactate concentration, the product of anaerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, the putatively advantageous PPARA haplotype is correlated with serum free fatty acid levels, suggesting a possible decrease in the activity of fatty acid oxidation. Although further studies are required to assess the molecular mechanisms underlying these patterns...

Genetic Signatures Reveal High-Altitude Adaptation in a Set of Ethiopian Populations

Huerta-Sánchez, Emilia; DeGiorgio, Michael; Pagani, Luca; Tarekegn, Ayele; Ekong, Rosemary; Antao, Tiago; Cardona, Alexia; Montgomery, Hugh E.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Robbins, Peter A.; Weale, Michael E.; Bradman, Neil; Bekele, Endashaw; Kivisild, Toom
Fonte: Oxford University Press Publicador: Oxford University Press
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
605.56066%
The Tibetan and Andean Plateaus and Ethiopian highlands are the largest regions to have long-term high-altitude residents. Such populations are exposed to lower barometric pressures and hence atmospheric partial pressures of oxygen. Such “hypobaric hypoxia” may limit physical functional capacity, reproductive health, and even survival. As such, selection of genetic variants advantageous to hypoxic adaptation is likely to have occurred. Identifying signatures of such selection is likely to help understanding of hypoxic adaptive processes. Here, we seek evidence of such positive selection using five Ethiopian populations, three of which are from high-altitude areas in Ethiopia. As these populations may have been recipients of Eurasian gene flow, we correct for this admixture. Using single-nucleotide polymorphism genotype data from multiple populations, we find the strongest signal of selection in BHLHE41 (also known as DEC2 or SHARP1). Remarkably, a major role of this gene is regulation of the same hypoxia response pathway on which selection has most strikingly been observed in both Tibetan and Andean populations. Because it is also an important player in the circadian rhythm pathway, BHLHE41 might also provide insights into the mechanisms underlying the recognized impacts of hypoxia on the circadian clock. These results support the view that Ethiopian...

Genomic Analysis of Natural Selection and Phenotypic Variation in High-Altitude Mongolians

Xing, Jinchuan; Wuren, Tana; Simonson, Tatum S.; Watkins, W. Scott; Witherspoon, David J.; Wu, Wilfred; Qin, Ga; Huff, Chad D.; Jorde, Lynn B.; Ge, Ri-Li
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
616.72867%
Deedu (DU) Mongolians, who migrated from the Mongolian steppes to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau approximately 500 years ago, are challenged by environmental conditions similar to native Tibetan highlanders. Identification of adaptive genetic factors in this population could provide insight into coordinated physiological responses to this environment. Here we examine genomic and phenotypic variation in this unique population and present the first complete analysis of a Mongolian whole-genome sequence. High-density SNP array data demonstrate that DU Mongolians share genetic ancestry with other Mongolian as well as Tibetan populations, specifically in genomic regions related with adaptation to high altitude. Several selection candidate genes identified in DU Mongolians are shared with other Asian groups (e.g., EDAR), neighboring Tibetan populations (including high-altitude candidates EPAS1, PKLR, and CYP2E1), as well as genes previously hypothesized to be associated with metabolic adaptation (e.g., PPARG). Hemoglobin concentration, a trait associated with high-altitude adaptation in Tibetans, is at an intermediate level in DU Mongolians compared to Tibetans and Han Chinese at comparable altitude. Whole-genome sequence from a DU Mongolian (Tianjiao1) shows that about 2% of the genomic variants...

Shared and Unique Signals of High-Altitude Adaptation in Geographically Distinct Tibetan Populations

Wuren, Tana; Simonson, Tatum S.; Qin, Ga; Xing, Jinchuan; Huff, Chad D.; Witherspoon, David J.; Jorde, Lynn B.; Ge, Ri-Li
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 18/03/2014 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
582.9361%
Recent studies have used a variety of analytical methods to identify genes targeted by selection in high-altitude populations located throughout the Tibetan Plateau. Despite differences in analytic strategies and sample location, hypoxia-related genes, including EPAS1 and EGLN1, were identified in multiple studies. By applying the same analytic methods to genome-wide SNP information used in our previous study of a Tibetan population (n = 31) from the township of Maduo, located in the northeastern corner of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (4200 m), we have identified common targets of natural selection in a second geographically and linguistically distinct Tibetan population (n = 46) in the Tuo Tuo River township (4500 m). Our analyses provide evidence for natural selection based on iHS and XP-EHH signals in both populations at the p<0.02 significance level for EPAS1, EGLN1, HMOX2, and CYP17A1 and for PKLR, HFE, and HBB and HBG2, which have also been reported in other studies. We highlight differences (i.e., stratification and admixture) in the two distinct Tibetan groups examined here and report selection candidate genes common to both groups. These findings should be considered in the prioritization of selection candidate genes in future genetic studies in Tibet.

Widespread Signals of Convergent Adaptation to High Altitude in Asia and America

Foll, Matthieu; Gaggiotti, Oscar E.; Daub, Josephine T.; Vatsiou, Alexandra; Excoffier, Laurent
Fonte: Elsevier Publicador: Elsevier
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 02/10/2014 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
615.90266%
Living at high altitude is one of the most difficult challenges that humans had to cope with during their evolution. Whereas several genomic studies have revealed some of the genetic bases of adaptations in Tibetan, Andean, and Ethiopian populations, relatively little evidence of convergent evolution to altitude in different continents has accumulated. This lack of evidence can be due to truly different evolutionary responses, but it can also be due to the low power of former studies that have mainly focused on populations from a single geographical region or performed separate analyses on multiple pairs of populations to avoid problems linked to shared histories between some populations. We introduce here a hierarchical Bayesian method to detect local adaptation that can deal with complex demographic histories. Our method can identify selection occurring at different scales, as well as convergent adaptation in different regions. We apply our approach to the analysis of a large SNP data set from low- and high-altitude human populations from America and Asia. The simultaneous analysis of these two geographic areas allows us to identify several candidate genome regions for altitudinal selection, and we show that convergent evolution among continents has been quite common. In addition to identifying several genes and biological processes involved in high-altitude adaptation...

Human high-altitude adaptation: forward genetics meets the HIF pathway

Bigham, Abigail W.; Lee, Frank S.
Fonte: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press Publicador: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 15/10/2014 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
600.39406%
Humans have adapted to the chronic hypoxia of high altitude in several locations, and recent genome-wide studies have indicated a genetic basis. In some populations, genetic signatures have been identified in the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway, which orchestrates the transcriptional response to hypoxia. This review by Bigham and Lee discusses these findings on human adaptation to high altitude.

A Novel Candidate Region for Genetic Adaptation to High Altitude in Andean Populations

Valverde, Guido; Zhou, Hang; Lippold, Sebastian; de Filippo, Cesare; Tang, Kun; López Herráez, David; Li, Jing; Stoneking, Mark
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 11/05/2015 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
608.23465%
Humans living at high altitude (≥2,500 meters above sea level) have acquired unique abilities to survive the associated extreme environmental conditions, including hypoxia, cold temperature, limited food availability and high levels of free radicals and oxidants. Long-term inhabitants of the most elevated regions of the world have undergone extensive physiological and/or genetic changes, particularly in the regulation of respiration and circulation, when compared to lowland populations. Genome scans have identified candidate genes involved in altitude adaption in the Tibetan Plateau and the Ethiopian highlands, in contrast to populations from the Andes, which have not been as intensively investigated. In the present study, we focused on three indigenous populations from Bolivia: two groups of Andean natives, Aymara and Quechua, and the low-altitude control group of Guarani from the Gran Chaco lowlands. Using pooled samples, we identified a number of SNPs exhibiting large allele frequency differences over 900,000 genotyped SNPs. A region in chromosome 10 (within the cytogenetic bands q22.3 and q23.1) was significantly differentiated between highland and lowland groups. We resequenced ~1.5 Mb surrounding the candidate region and identified strong signals of positive selection in the highland populations. A composite of multiple signals like test localized the signal to FAM213A and a related enhancer; the product of this gene acts as an antioxidant to lower oxidative stress and may help to maintain bone mass. The results suggest that positive selection on the enhancer might increase the expression of this antioxidant...

Two functional loci in the promoter of EPAS1 gene involved in high-altitude adaptation of Tibetans

Xu, Xiang-Hong; Huang, Xue-Wen; Qun, Li; Li, Ya-Nan; Wang, Yi; Liu, Chao; Ma, Yanyun; Liu, Qing-Mei; Sun, Kang; Qian, Feng; Jin, Li; Wang, Jiucun
Fonte: Nature Publishing Group Publicador: Nature Publishing Group
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em 12/12/2014 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
705.1409%
EPAS1 involves in the hypoxic response and is suggested to be responsible for the genetic adaptation of high-altitude hypoxia in Tibetans. However, the detailed molecular mechanism remains unknown. In this study, a single nucleotide polymorphism rs56721780:G>C and an insertion/deletion (indel) polymorphism −742 indel in the promoter region showed divergence between Tibetans and non-Tibetan lowlanders. rs56721780:G>C regulated the transcription of EPAS1 by IKAROS family zinc finger 1 (IKZF1), which was identified as a new transcriptional repressor for EPAS1 gene. It demonstrated that the C allele of rs56721780:G>C decreased the binding of IKZF1, leading to the attenuated transcriptional repression of EPAS1 gene. The insertion at −742 indel provided a new binding site for Sp1 and was related to the activation of EPAS1 promoter. Further functional analysis revealed that lysyl oxidase (LOX) gene, which was reported to be responsible for extracellular matrix protein cross-linking of amnion previously, was a direct target of EPAS1. The CC genotype at rs56721780:G>C and the insertion genotype at −742 indel were found associated with higher EPAS1 and LOX expression levels in amnion, as well as higher birth weight of Tibetan newborns...

Mechanisms of Hemoglobin Adaptation to High Altitude Hypoxia

Storz, Jay F.; Moriyama, Hideaki
Fonte: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. Publicador: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em /06/2008 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
711.1335%
Storz, Jay F., and Hideaki Moriyama. Mechanisms of hemoglobin adaptation. High Alt. Med. Biol. 9:148–157, 2008.—Evidence from a number of vertebrate taxa suggests that modifications of hemoglobin (Hb) function may often play a key role in mediating an adaptive response to high altitude hypoxia. The respiratory functions of Hb are a product of the protein's intrinsic O2-binding affinity and its interactions with allosteric effectors such as protons, chloride ions, CO2, and organic phosphates. Here we review several case studies involving high altitude vertebrates where it has been possible to identify specific mechanisms of Hb adaptation to hypoxia. In addition to comparative studies of Hbs from diverse animal species, functional studies of human Hb mutants also suggest that there is ample scope for evolutionary adjustments in Hb–O2 affinity through alterations of the equilibrium constants of O2 binding to deoxy- and oxyHb or through changes in the allosteric equilibrium constants for the transition between the deoxy- and oxyHb quaternary structures. It may be the case that certain evolutionary paths are followed more often than others simply because they are subject to less stringent pleiotropic constraints.

Short-term responses of the kidney to high altitude in mountain climbers

Goldfarb-Rumyantzev, Alexander S.; Alper, Seth L.
Fonte: Oxford University Press Publicador: Oxford University Press
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
616.94656%
In high-altitude climbers, the kidneys play a crucial role in acclimatization and in mountain sickness syndromes [acute mountain sickness (AMS), high-altitude cerebral edema, high-altitude pulmonary edema] through their roles in regulating body fluids, electrolyte and acid–base homeostasis. Here, we discuss renal responses to several high-altitude-related stresses, including changes in systemic volume status, renal plasma flow and clearance, and altered acid–base and electrolyte status. Volume regulation is considered central both to high-altitude adaptation and to maladaptive development of mountain sickness. The rapid and powerful diuretic response to the hypobaric hypoxic stimulus of altitude integrates decreased circulating concentrations of antidiuretic hormone, renin and aldosterone, increased levels of natriuretic hormones, plasma and urinary epinephrine, norepinephrine, endothelin and urinary adrenomedullin, with increased insensible fluid losses and reduced fluid intake. The ventilatory and hormonal responses to hypoxia may predict susceptibility to AMS, also likely influenced by multiple genetic factors. The timing of altitude increases and adaptation also modifies the body's physiologic responses to altitude. While hypovolemia develops as part of the diuretic response to altitude...

A novel candidate region for genetic adaptation to high altitude in Andean populations

Valverde, G.; Zhou, H.; Lippold, S.; De Filippo, C.; Tang, K.; Herráez, D.L.; Li, J.; Stoneking, M.
Fonte: Public Library of Science Publicador: Public Library of Science
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Publicado em //2015 EN
Relevância na Pesquisa
608.23465%
Humans living at high altitude (≥ 2,500 meters above sea level) have acquired unique abilities to survive the associated extreme environmental conditions, including hypoxia, cold temperature, limited food availability and high levels of free radicals and oxidants. Long-term inhabitants of the most elevated regions of the world have undergone extensive physiological and/or genetic changes, particularly in the regulation of respiration and circulation, when compared to lowland populations. Genome scans have identified candidate genes involved in altitude adaption in the Tibetan Plateau and the Ethiopian highlands, in contrast to populations from the Andes, which have not been as intensively investigated. In the present study, we focused on three indigenous populations from Bolivia: two groups of Andean natives, Aymara and Quechua, and the low-altitude control group of Guarani from the Gran Chaco lowlands. Using pooled samples, we identified a number of SNPs exhibiting large allele frequency differences over 900,000 genotyped SNPs. A region in chromosome 10 (within the cytogenetic bands q22.3 and q23.1) was significantly differentiated between highland and lowland groups. We resequenced ~1.5 Mb surrounding the candidate region and identified strong signals of positive selection in the highland populations. A composite of multiple signals like test localized the signal to FAM213A and a related enhancer; the product of this gene acts as an antioxidant to lower oxidative stress and may help to maintain bone mass. The results suggest that positive selection on the enhancer might increase the expression of this antioxidant...

Widespread signals of convergent adaptation to high altitude in Asia and America

Foll, Matthieu; Gaggiotti, Oscar E.; Daub, Josephine T.; Vatsiou, Alexandra; Excoffier, Laurent
Fonte: Universidade Cornell Publicador: Universidade Cornell
Tipo: Artigo de Revista Científica
Relevância na Pesquisa
615.90266%
Living at high-altitude is one of the most difficult challenges that humans had to cope with during their evolution. Whereas several genomic studies have revealed some of the genetic bases of adaptations in Tibetan, Andean and Ethiopian populations, relatively little evidence of convergent evolution to altitude in different continents has accumulated. This lack of evidence can be due to truly different evolutionary responses, but it can be also due to the low power of former studies that have mainly focused on populations from a single geographical region or performed separate analyses on multiple pairs of populations to avoid problems linked to shared histories between some populations. We introduce here a hierarchical Bayesian method to detect local adaptation that can deal with complex demographic histories. Our method can identify selection occurring at different scales, as well as convergent adaptation in different regions. We apply our approach to the analysis of a large SNP dataset from low- and high-altitude human populations from America and Asia. The simultaneous analysis of these two geographic areas allows us to identify several candidate genome regions for altitudinal selection, and we show that convergent evolution among continents has been quite common. In addition to identifying several genes and biological processes involved in high altitude adaptation...